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Hericium erinaceus Culture | Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale

$145.00

Common name: Lion’s Mane
Fruiting Temperature: 60–80 °F

Lion’s Mane thrives on hardwoods, producing excellent fruit bodies with cascading icicle-like teeth. It has a delicious lobster-like flavor, and it is widely recognized for providing support to the brain and neurological system. The Lion’s Mane is easy and rapid to grow, benefiting even the novice grower.

Fungi Perfecti is constantly working with these strains, screening and maintaining cell lines. Fungi Perfecti is releasing the following strains for use on a conditional basis.

Each order of in vitro mushroom cultures is custom-made: lead time for cultures is 6–8 weeks from date of order.

Please note: Unlike our ready-to-grow Mushroom Patches and Mushroom Plug Spawn, our cultures do not come with instructions. It is expected that the client is adequately conversant with mushroom cultivation procedure to employ these cultures. The books Growing Gourmet & Medicinal Mushrooms and The Mushroom Cultivator are vital resources in this attempt.

Hericium erinaceus Culture | Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale

Common name: Lion’s Mane
Fruiting Temperature: 60–80 °F

 Hericium erinaceus Culture | Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale. Lion’s Mane thrives on hardwoods, producing excellent fruit bodies with cascading icicle-like teeth. It has a delicious lobster-like flavor, and it is widely recognized for providing support to the brain and neurological system. The Lion’s Mane is easy and rapid to grow, benefiting even the novice grower.

Fungi Perfecti is constantly working with these strains, screening and maintaining cell lines. Fungi Perfecti is releasing the following strains for usage on a conditional basis. Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale

Each order of in vitro mushroom cultures is custom-made: lead time for cultures is 6–8 weeks from date of order. Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale

Please note: Unlike our ready-to-grow Mushroom Patches and Mushroom Plug Spawn, our cultures do not come with instructions. It is assumed that the purchaser is sufficiently familiar with mushroom culture technique to utilize these cultures. The books Growing Gourmet & Medicinal Mushrooms and The Mushroom Cultivator are essential tools in this endeavor.

By purchasing these cultures, the client agrees to the conditions of the Mushroom Culture Sale Agreement. Each strain is identified with the Stamets P Value® scale, representing the growth of mycelium covering a 100 x 15 mm petri dish (about 1,000–2,000 cell divisions). The first time a wild species is tissue grown, the age is indicated as P-O. Thereafter each succeeding growth across the petri dish’s surface is specified in increments of P-l, etc. This library seeks to retain strains closest to their wild origins or near to their peak fruiting potentials. Each culture comes in a 125 x 20 mm glass test tube.

A kind of Hericium erinaceus culture base and cultivation method thereof

Technical field
The present invention relates to fungus growing technique, be specifically related to a kind of Hericium erinaceus culture base and cultivation method thereof.

Hericium erinaceus Culture | Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale

Hericium erinaceus (also known as lion’s mane mushroom, mountain-priest mushroom, or bearded tooth fungus) is a tooth fungus that is edible. Long spines (more than 1 cm long), predominance on hardwoods, and predisposition to develop a single cluster of hanging spines define it as a native of North America, Europe, and Asia. The fruit bodies may be harvested and utilized in the cookery.

Hericium erinaceus is readily mistaken with other Hericium species that grow in the same location. These mushrooms can be found in the wild on hardwood trees, mainly American beech and maple, in late summer and fall. Usually H. erinaceus is classified saprophytic, as it usually feeds on decaying trees. However, it may also be seen on live trees, hence may be a tree parasite. This might imply an endophytic environment.

Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Basidiomycota
Class: Agaricomycetes
Order: Russulales
Family: Hericiaceae
Genus: Hericium
Species:
H. erinaceus
Binomial name
Hericium erinaceus

(Bull.) Persoon (1797)
Synonyms
  • Hydnum erinaceus Bull. (1781)
  • Clavaria erinaceus
  • Dryodon erinaceus

Typical names

In Latin, the genus name Hericium and the species name erinaceus both imply “hedgehog.” The German term Igel-Stachelbart (literally, hedgehog goatee) and certain common English names, such as bearded hedgehog and hedgehog mushroom, reflect this.  Hericium erinaceus Culture for sale

Morphology

H. erinaceus develops enormous, irregular bulbous tubercules as its fruitbodies. They have a diameter of 5–40 cm (2–15.5 in) and are dominated by spore-producing spines that are 1–5 cm long or longer. The fruit bodies and spines are white to cream in color, although they can turn yellow-brown as they age.

Monomitic, amyloid, and composed of thin- to thick-walled hyphae of 3–15 microns (um) in width, the hyphal system is monomitic and amyloid. Clamped septa and gloeoplerous components (filled with oily, resinous substances) are also visible in the hyphae, which can enter the hymenium as gloeocystidia.

The basidia are 25–40 um length and 5–7 um width, with a basal clamp and four spores per. The white amyloid basidiospores have a length of 5–7 um and a width of 4–5 um. The spore morphology ranges from subglobose to short ellipsoid, with a smooth to coarsely roughened surface.

Yields and strains

Fungal strains are analogous to plant kinds in crop breeding when it comes to fungus culture.

In a pure culture, fungal strains are clonal descendants of a single isolation from a single fungal colony. Hericium spp. are found in the wild in North America, Europe, and Asia, and despite significant scientific inquiry, they are not typically produced industrially. As a result, there are few commercially available strains in the United States and Europe, and there has been little or no breeding for greater yield or other desired traits. [10] H. erinaceus yields of 165g per 1 kg medium have been observed in Egyptian production tests.

Uses

Hericium erinaceus produces edible fruiting bodies that have uses as food and in traditional medicine. Some guides consider it inedible.

Culinary use

Hericium erinaceus is common in gourmet cooking. Young specimens are regarded the best. Alongside shiitake (Lentinus edodes) and oyster (Pleurotus ostreatus) mushrooms, H. erinaceus is utilized as a speciality mushroom. Its flavor may be similar to that of lobster. The output of speciality mushrooms in the USA rose by roughly 23 percent between 2010 and 2018 from 16 to 20 million pounds (7–9 million kg).

Hericium erinaceus fruiting bodies contain 57 percent  carbohydrates (8 percent as dietary fiber), 4 percent  fat, and 22 percent  protein.

Phytochemicals

Hericium erinaceus contains diverse phytochemicals, including polysaccharides, such as β-glucan, as well as hericenones and erinacines. From its essential oil, 77 aroma and flavor compounds were identified, including hexadecanoic acid (26 percent of total oil composition), linoleic acid (13 percent ), phenylacetaldehyde (9 percent ) and benzaldehyde (3 percent ), and other oils, such as 2-methyl-3-furanthiol, 2-ethylpyrazine and 2,6-diethylpyrazine. Low amounts of ergosterol are found.

Cultivation

Substrate requirements

As a saprophyte that occurs on dead wood, H. erinaceus requires adequate substrate factors, including sufficient carbon and nitrogen supplies, a particular pH value and ideal carbon/nitrogen ratio.

Many different substrates have been successfully employed for this mushroom growing. Depending on the method of cultivation, the substrate can be either solid (artificial log) or liquid (submerged culture and deep submerged culture) (submerged culture and deep submerged culture).

The solid substrate is most typically a mixture of sawdust of hardwood or conifer containing diverse complements that may include wheat bran, wheat straw, soybean meal, corn meal, rice bran and rice straw. For example, H. erinaceus strains thrive on beech sawdust substrate supplemented with wheat bran (20 percent ), rye grain (25 percent ), soybean meal (7 percent ), rapeseed meal (10 percent ) or meat-osseous flour (6 percent ). (6 percent ).

An example of a liquid substrate composition can be glucose for the carbon source, soybean powder, corn powder, and wheat bran powder as a complex nitrogen source. The pH values most appropriate for the beneficial development of H. erinaceus were in the range of 5.0 – 9.0, with pH 6.0 being best.

Climate requirements

Hericium erinaceus demands a humid environment for its growth: 85 to 90 percent of relative humidity in the air. The incubation temperature best suited for the mycelial growth of H. erinaceus was determined to be 25 °C, while the optimal temperature for vegetative development was 26 °C. H. erinaceus is unable to grow with a water potential lower than -5 Mpa.

Cultivation techniques

The artificial culture of H. erinaceus was first described in China in 1988. It is planted using fake logs, bottles and polypropylene bags. However, this method of artificial culture is not suited for industrialized production because to its poor yield and extended cultivation cycles.

Submerged culture is a kind of artificial growth of H. erinaceus which the fungus is cultivated in a liquid media. Using this procedure, a huge number of mycelia may be obtained fast. Bioactive chemicals can be derived from the fruiting bodies, submerged-cultivated mycelial biomass or liquid-cultivated broth. Growers adjust the culture medium composition to get concurrently high yields of H. erinaceus mycelial biomass, exopolysaccharides, and polysaccharides. Submerged fermentation is ideal for the development of mycelial biomass and biologically active metabolites in order to generate a more homogenous biomass and extract products.

Growth regulators, such as 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and gibberellin, were discovered to have a beneficial influence on spore germination. Other technologies, including red and green laser light of low intensity, accelerated spore germination as well as the vegetative development of mycelium. Argon and helium lasers also led to the acceleration of fruit body growth by 36–51 percent .

Wild strains

Wild strains of Hericium spp. can be separated and propagated by first harvesting fruiting bodies from fallen trees in the natural habitat. The fruiting bodies can then be opened to get bits of their inner spore-producing tissue. This tissue is then put onto petri dishes with agar to culture fungal colonies at 25 °C. After multiple transfers to new petri plates to check the purity of the strain, it can be stored at -80 °C for long-term preservation.

Quantity

1, 145

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